Cranberry Sauce for Grownups: Cranberry-Port Conserve

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I found a recipe on Epicurious.com years ago that I still use to this day. You cook the berries with sugar, port and orange peel and then add cranberies and walnuts. I like it because it has depth. I like it because it has port. I like it because it has nuts — and therefore texture. As a member of my Thanksgiving celebration likes to say: “It’s cranberry sauce for grownups.”

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So I start by putting the berries, port and sugar in the pan and cook until the sugar is dissolved.

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Get out your ingredients:

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You chop up an orange:

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Put that in the pot and let it cook until the orange is soft and the cranberries break:

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Then you add your currants:

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Let that cool, then stir in the chopped walnuts:

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Cranberry-Port Conserve Bon Appétit | November 1996

A conserve usually consists of a mixture of fresh fruits, often with raisins, currants or nuts added. New England seafarers prized citrus fruits, which are perfect with native cranberries.
Yield: 3 Cups

1 12-ounce package fresh or frozen cranberries
3/4 cup sugar
2/3 cup ruby Port
1 medium navel orange, unpeeled, chopped
1/4 cup chopped currants
1/3 cup chopped walnutsI found a recipe on Epicurious.com years ago that I still use to this day. You cook the berries with sugar, port and orange peel and then add cranberies and walnuts. I like it because it has depth. I like it because it has port. I like it because it has nuts — and therefore texture. As Katherine Martin likes to say: “It’s cranberry sauce for grownups.”

null

So I start by putting the berries, port and sugar in the pan and cook until the sugar is dissolved.

null

null

Get out your ingredients:

null

You chop up an orange:

null

null

Put that in the pot and let it cook until the orange is soft and the cranberries break:

null

null

Then you add your currants:

null

null

Let that cool, then stir in the chopped walnuts:

null

Cranberry-Port Conserve Bon Appétit | November 1996

A conserve usually consists of a mixture of fresh fruits, often with raisins, currants or nuts added. New England seafarers prized citrus fruits, which are perfect with native cranberries.
Yield: 3 Cups

1 12-ounce package fresh or frozen cranberries
3/4 cup sugar
2/3 cup ruby Port
1 medium navel orange, unpeeled, chopped
1/4 cup chopped dried currants
1/3 cup chopped walnuts

Combine cranberries, sugar and Port in heavy large saucepan. Bring mixture to boil over medium-high heat, stirring until sugar dissolves. Reduce heat to medium-low; add chopped orange and simmer until cranberries burst and mixture thickens slightly, about 15 minutes. Mix in dried currants. Cool cranberry conserve completely. Stir in chopped walnuts. (Cranberry conserve can be prepared 3 days ahead. Cover tightly and refrigerate.)

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About Author

Liz Johnson is content strategist for The Journal News and lohud.com, and the founding editor of lohudfood, formerly know as Small Bites. As food editor, she won awards from the New York News Publishers Association, the Association of Food Journalists and the Associated Press. She lives in Nyack with her husband and daughter on a tiny suburban lot they call their farm — with fruit trees, an herb garden, and a yardful of lettuce, tomatoes, onions, shallots, cucumbers, zucchini, radishes, cabbage, peppers, Brussels sprouts and carrots and four big blueberry bushes.

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