More on cocktail history: Recipes and a Westchester connection

0

Liz did me the honor of carrying a version of my Sunday blog post about David Wondrich’s cocktail seminar in today’s print editions of The Journal News.

Print readers had the benefit of receiving adaptions of Wondrich’s recipes. Here they are for Small Bites readers:

Traditional punch

    Ingredients

» 5 lemons
» Sugar
» 2 bottles Jameson 12 Aged Irish Whiskey
» 1/2 bottle Madeira
» 1 quart lemon juice
» 1 1/2 quarts water
» Freshly ground nutmeg

    Directions

Peel the lemons and place them in a bowl. Cover lightly with sugar and muddle them. Allow to mascerate while you prepare the rest of the punch.

In a large silver bowl filled with large chunks of ice, add the Jameson, Madeira, lemon juice, and water. Stir in the lemon peels and dust with freshly ground nutmeg. Serve in small cups.

Adapted from David Wondrich

Improved Brandy Cocktail

    Ingredients

» 2 1/2 ounces Martell VS Cognac
» Equal dashes (1 teaspoon each) of Orange Curaçao, Angosturra Bitters, raw-sugar simple syrup

    Directions

Gather ingredients over ice in a shaker and shake vigorously. Garnish with a lemon peel and serve in a small wine glass or coupe.

Adapted from David Wondrich

Martini

    Ingredients

» 1 1/2 ounces Beefeater London dry gin
» 1 1/2 ounces Noilly Prat vermouth
» Dashes of orange bitters

    Directions

Gather ingredients over ice in a mixing glass and stir thoroughly, ensuring the drink is cold enough. Serve in a coupe.

Adapted from David Wondrich

Singapore Sling

    Ingredients

» 2 1/2 ounces Plymouth gin
» Equal dashes (1 teaspoon each) of cherry heering, Angostura and Benedictine.
» Soda water

    Directions

Gather over ice in a Collins glass and stir vigorously. Top with soda water.

Adapted from David Wondrich

A Westchester connection
I had a nice note from reader Ron Freeman of Mount Kisco, who posits that the word cocktail may entered the vernacular in Elmsford. Ron writes:

In the 1930s we moved to Orchard Hill, which abuts the southerly boundary of the village of Elmsford, and became familiar with a tavern, at the northeast corner of Tarrytown Road (Route 119) and Saw Mill River Road, known as O’Brien’s Chateau. The tavern had a large neon sign of a cocktail glass with a prominent feather sticking out of the glass and the lettering “Home of the First Cocktail!” Historical records indicate that one Abraham Storm constructed the tavern in the early 18th century and that, during the Revolutionary War, colonial and French officers frequented the tavern where Betsy, the barmaid, decorated their libations with chicken feathers from the local Torie hen-coops, thereby producing the nickname! …
… There are other versions [of the word’s origin], but I think the first is the most colorful and plausible! Hope you find the above of interest, I’m sure many other area “old-timers” will have similar recollections.

Thanks, Ron. I’ll do some research to see if this theory holds water (or booze!) with cocktail historians.

Share.

About Author

Ed Forbes is the Digital Team Leader at LoHud.com and The Journal News. He holds a master's degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and a bachelor's degree from St. Lawrence University in Canton, N.Y. Prior to joining The Journal News in 2008, he was editor of the weekly Lake Placid News in Lake Placid, N.Y. He lives in Mount Kisco with his wife and their dog.

Leave A Reply