Latin Twist: Ceviche Part 2

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Last week, I introduced (or re-introduced!) many of you to ceviche—and promised a couple more recipes! (Thanks, by the way, for your support and feedback!)

This particular ceviche relatively new one for me; I knew I wanted to use salmon, and wanted flavors that complemented without too much spice (I have to be careful with that especially when cooking for my parents). As in the creation of other ceviches, I wanted to balance the flavors, textures, and colors. The result? Turns out I’ve won over some new fans with this one! In fact, a friend who usually doesn’t like ceviche, really enjoyed this (asked for seconds!) So, for more reluctant ceviche eaters, this may be a good starting point. Here you’ll see I served it as a side dish on shells (yes–ran ’em through the dishwasher!); it makes for more of a seaside-style presentation (and it’s fun!).

What can you serve ceviche with? It’s great on its own–especially with Pisco Sours or sangría, or your favorite chilled white wine. I served it initially as an appetizer for a roast chicken dinner and that worked well. I would also recommend it as part of Sunday brunch, with a Tortilla Española (Spanish-style potato omelette), and a small leafy green salad. Ah…so many possibilities! ¡Buen provecho! Enjoy!

Salmon, Mango and Roasted Pepper Ceviche
Serves 8 to 10 as a small appetizer

1 pound wild salmon, skin removed
Mango
4 roasted peppers, 2 red and 2 yellow
1/2 roasted jalapeño (optional), finely diced (I didn’t include this for my parents—nor for people I knew wouldn’t enjoy the extra kick.)
2 limes
4 oranges
2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger
1/4 cup olive oil
Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper
Fresh cilantro
Scallions
Honey to taste (I added 1 teaspoon)

Dice the salmon into 1/4-inch chunks and place in a bowl. Cut the mango into 1/4-inch chunks, and add. Also dice the roasted peppers, and add them to the bowl.

Juice the limes and oranges and pour the juice into another bowl. Add the grated ginger, olive oil, salt and pepper. Whisk, and taste. Add honey if desired—just for slight sweetness if needed. Pour the juices over the salmon mixture, stir, cover and refrigerate for at least an hour (I made it about 3 hours ahead of time—but then ate it the next day, too, and it was great!).

Chop the cilantro leaves and the light and dark green parts of the scallions and set aside.

Serve the ceviche in glasses, small dishes, atop cucumber slices (what I do for cocktail parties!) or in shells, as pictured here, or with chips on a dish, as pictured below. Sprinkle the scallion/cilantro mixture just before serving.

 

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About Author

Maybe it was the dinner parties my mom always threw—or the hours I spent prepping and cooking alongside her (and then on my own!). Or maybe it was array of fabulous dishes that my family sampled in New York City’s richly diverse restaurants, but I’ve loved creating, savoring, and sharing food for as long as I can remember. Living in Spain, and later in Peru, also greatly influenced my life. These years abroad taught me Spanish—and about living in different countries–but also introduced me to teaching English as a second language, which I’ve done—mostly in the US– for the past 20-plus (yikes!) years. I’ve authored two cocktail/tapas books, Mambo Mixers and Calypso Coolers, coauthored more than 15 others (mostly food related!), and raised two children. Now I’m chef and owner of my own restaurant, Mambo 64 in Tuckahoe, New York. My message is the same, whether I’m teaching, writing, running the restaurant or being a regular guest on the Spanish-language network Telemundo (on the morning show, Buenos Días Nueva York!). My belief in food—and the power of food—is far reaching, and is married with another one: the power of stories. I’m sure that if we could all sit down and have meals together, sharing both tastes and tales, we’d have peace on earth. Enjoy!

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