Pumpkin Latkes with Spiced Cranberry Sour Cream


Pumpkin Latkes with Spiced Cranberry Sour Cream

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Serving Size: 10.

Pumpkin Latkes with Spiced Cranberry Sour Cream

Sour cream not on your Hanukkah-Thanksgiving menu? Applesauce is an easy and delicious substitute. By The Associated Press


  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped dried cranberries
  • 2 tablespoons packed dark brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
  • Vegetable oil
  • 1 medium yellow onion, chopped
  • 1 small sugar pumpkin, peeled, seeded and shredded (about 3 cups)
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • Toasted pecans, to garnish


  1. In a small bowl, stir together the sour cream, cranberries, brown sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves. Set aside.
  2. In a medium skillet over medium, heat 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil. Add the onion and cook until very tender and well browned, about 12 to 15 minutes. Transfer the onion (reserving the skillet) to a medium bowl and mix in the shredded pumpkin, eggs, flour, salt and black pepper.
  3. Wipe out the skillet used to cook the onions. Return it to medium-high heat and add a 1 / 4inch of vegetable oil. Working in batches, scoop the pumpkin mixture by the heaping tablespoonful into the pan, 3 or 4 scoops at a time. Flatten each scoop with the back of the spatula and cook until browned on both sides and tender at the center, about 3 minutes per side.
  4. Transfer to a wire rack set over a baking sheet to drain. Serve topped with the cranberry sour cream and garnished with toasted pecans.


Nutrition information per serving: 140 calories; 80 calories from fat (57 percent of total calories); 9 g fat (3.5 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 50 mg cholesterol; 12 g carbohydrate; 1 g fiber; 7 g sugar; 3 g protein; 220 mg sodium.



About Author

Liz Johnson is content strategist for The Journal News and lohud.com, and the founding editor of lohudfood, formerly know as Small Bites. As food editor, she won awards from the New York News Publishers Association, the Association of Food Journalists and the Associated Press. She lives in Nyack with her husband and daughter on a tiny suburban lot they call their farm — with fruit trees, an herb garden, and a yardful of lettuce, tomatoes, onions, shallots, cucumbers, zucchini, radishes, cabbage, peppers, Brussels sprouts and carrots and four big blueberry bushes.

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