Snowed in? Bake these cookies

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What’s a snow day without baking? We like cookies, warm, gooey and your best bet for filling the house with a happy scent.

Here are two delectable cookie recipes, straight from the kitchen of Lohud food editor Liz Johnson.

And don’t miss Snowed in? Bake these cakes.

cookies

Chocolate Toffee Cookies

From Smitten Kitchen, adapted from Bon Appetit

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup all purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 pound bittersweet (not unsweetened) or semisweet chocolate, chopped
  • 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter
  • 1 3/4 cups (packed) brown sugar
  • 4 large eggs
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 5 1.4-ounce chocolate-covered English toffee bars (such as Heath), coarsely chopped*
  • 1 cup walnuts, toasted, chopped
  • Flaky sea salt for sprinkling (optional)

Instructions

  1. Stir chocolate and butter in top of double boiler set over simmering water until melted and smooth. Remove from over water. Cool mixture to lukewarm.
  2. Combine flour, baking powder and salt in small bowl; whisk to blend.
  3. Using electric mixer, beat sugar and eggs in bowl until thick, about 5 minutes. Beat in chocolate mixture and vanilla.
  4. Stir in flour mixture, then toffee and nuts. Chill batter until firm, about 45 minutes.
  5. Preheat oven to 350°F. Line 2 large baking sheets with parchment or waxed paper. Drop batter by spoonfuls onto sheets, spacing two inches apart. Sprinkle with a pinch of flaky sea salt, if you’re using it. Bake just until tops are dry and cracked but cookies are still soft to touch, about 12 to 15 minutes. Cool on sheets. (Can be made 2 days ahead. Store airtight at room temperature.)
  6. I know that it will be impossible to let them cool completely, but they really taste a lot better cool, as they continue baking once they come out of the oven.

Notes

Slice and bake option: After struggling a bit to scoop these cookies, I rolled the dough into a log 1.5 inches in diameter and chilled it. When I was ready to bake the cookies, I cut it into 1/2-inch slices. You can store the dough log in the freezer, wrapped in waxed paper and then two layers of plastic wrap for up to a month, just baking the cookies off as you need. Cookies baked straight from the freezer may need an additional minute or two in the oven, depending on their thickness.

http://food.lohudblogs.com/2014/01/02/snowed-bake-cookies/

cranberry oatmeal chocolate chip cookies

Cranberry Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies

From Food & Wine, Nov. 2011

Ingredients

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup quick-cooking or old-fashioned rolled oats
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 1/2 sticks unsalted butter (10 ounces), at room temperature
  • 1 cup light brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 large egg, at room temperature
  • 1 large egg yolk, at room temperature
  • 1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1 1/2 cups semisweet or white chocolate chips
  • 1 1/2 cups dried cranberries

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 325°. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper.
  2. In a medium bowl, mix the flour with the oats, baking powder, baking soda and salt. In a standing mixer fitted with the paddle, beat the butter and both sugars at medium speed until creamy. Add the egg followed by the egg yolk and vanilla, beating well between additions and scraping down the side of the bowl as necessary. Beat in the dry ingredients, then add the chocolate chips and cranberries and beat until incorporated.
  3. Spoon heaping teaspoons of the dough onto the baking sheets, 2 inches apart. Bake for 12 to 15 minutes, until the cookies begin to brown at the edges. Let the cookies cool on the baking sheets, then transfer them to a rack to cool completely.

Notes

MAKE AHEAD The cookies can be stored in an airtight container for up to 4 days.

http://food.lohudblogs.com/2014/01/02/snowed-bake-cookies/

Read:  8 Great Things to Make in the Kitchen During a Snowstorm

 

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About Author

Megan McCaffrey is a food writer for The Journal News and contributor to the Small Bites Blog. She has a degree in Digital Media from Fordham University and a fondness for good craft beer. She loves to bake, read cooking blogs and taste all the Lower Hudson Valley has to offer. Megan lives in Ridgefield, Connecticut with her husband and three kids.

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