Latin Twist: Panamanian Ceviche

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It’s true: I most tout the virtues of Peruvian ceviche. But, mis queridos amigos, it’s a wide world of ceviche out there!

For today’s post I’ve chosen a light, elegant favorite, in honor of spring (have you seen these gorgeous flowers all around us?!) AND, well, Mother’s Day. This ceviche , adapted from my cocktail/tapas book, Calypso Coolers, is super simple, and perfect for making ahead of time and serving to your favorite moms, and more! In fact, my friends, you might want to serve this on the next big parental holiday: Father’s Day. This makes an ideal barbecue starter, especially with hmmm…how about a glass of Albariño (my new favorite white wine),  a Ginger-Lemonade Champagne Cocktail, OR a Caribbean Cocktail ? However you choose to complement your Panamanian Ceviche, I’m sure it will be wonderful! ¡Buen provecho! Enjoy!

 

Panamanian Ceviche Photograph by Ellie Miller, from Calypso Coolers by Arlen Gargagliano

 

Latin Twist: Panamanian Ceviche

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Cook Time: 4 hours

Yield: Makes 4 to 6 appetizer servings

Perfect as a barbecue appetizer or a light lunch, this Panamanian Ceviche is light, elegant, and tasty!

Ingredients

  • 1 pound boneless excellent-quality white fish like red snapper or sea bass
  • 1 1/2 cups finely chopped red onion
  • 10 1/2 ounces fresh lime juice
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped celery
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1/2 jalapeño pepper, finely minced
  • Salt, to taste
  • Saltines for serving

Instructions

  1. Cut the fish into bite-size pieces and place them in a glass bowl or a dish that's at least 2 inches high.
  2. In a separate bowl, combine the onion, lime juice, celery cilantro and jalapeño as desired.
  3. Pour the mixture n top of the fish; it should cover it.
  4. Add salt to taste.
  5. Cover with plastic wrap and place in the refrigerator for at least 4 hours (or until the fish starts to turn opaque) or up to 12.
  6. Serve in endive leaves or small lettuce-layered dishes, with crackers or saltines.
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http://food.lohudblogs.com/2014/05/09/latin-twist-panamanian-ceviche/

Panamanian Ceviche

Makes 4 to 6 servings

Prep time: 30 minutes

Cook time: 4 hours

1 pound boneless excellent-quality white fish like red snapper or sea bass
1 1/2 cups finely chopped red onion
10 1/2 ounces fresh lime juice
1/2 cup finely chopped celery
1/4 cup finely chopped fresh cilantro
1/2 jalapeño pepper, finely minced
Salt, to taste
Saltines for serving

Cut the fish into bite-size pieces and place them in a glass bowl or a dish that’s at least 2 inches high.
In a separate bowl, combine the onion, lime juice, celery cilantro and jalapeño as desired.
Pour the mixture n top of the fish; it should cover it.
Add salt to taste.
Cover with plastic wrap and place in the refrigerator for at least 4 hours (or until the fish starts to turn opaque) or up to 12.
Serve in endive leaves or small lettuce-layered dishes, with crackers or saltines.

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About Author

Maybe it was the dinner parties my mom always threw—or the hours I spent prepping and cooking alongside her (and then on my own!). Or maybe it was array of fabulous dishes that my family sampled in New York City’s richly diverse restaurants, but I’ve loved creating, savoring, and sharing food for as long as I can remember. Living in Spain, and later in Peru, also greatly influenced my life. These years abroad taught me Spanish—and about living in different countries--but also introduced me to teaching English as a second language, which I’ve done—mostly in the US-- for the past 20-plus (yikes!) years. I’ve authored two cocktail/tapas books, Mambo Mixers and Calypso Coolers, coauthored more than 15 others (mostly food related!), and raised two children. Now I'm chef and owner of my own restaurant, Mambo 64 in Tuckahoe, New York. My message is the same, whether I'm teaching, writing, running the restaurant or being a regular guest on the Spanish-language network Telemundo (on the morning show, Buenos Días Nueva York!). My belief in food—and the power of food—is far reaching, and is married with another one: the power of stories. I’m sure that if we could all sit down and have meals together, sharing both tastes and tales, we’d have peace on earth. Enjoy!

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