Latin Twist: Chayote and Grilled Peach Salsa

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As some of you may remember (!), I was in a bit of a peach competition last year! Though I lost the battle (!), my love for grilled peaches—and grilled peach salsa—goes on! Earlier this week, I picked up some gorgeous peaches (and some chayote) and started playing. The result is today’s post: Chayote and Grilled Peach Salsa.

Let me backtrack for a moment. Actually, the original, original version of this salsa comes from a book I worked on for Chef Rafael Palomino (Nueva Salsa: Recipes to Spice it up, ©2003, Chronicle Books, Palomino/Gargagliano). The original version doesn’t have the grilled peaches, but I just love that roasty flavor that a bit of grilling brings to one of my favorite fruits.

chayote

Chayote, if you’ve never seen/cooked/tasted one before, is a fun food to play with! Indigenous to Mexico, and pronounced chahy-oh-tee, this light green, pear shaped fruit has a single pit, and edible flesh and skin. The “meat” of the chayote can be served cooked or raw; it’s mild in flavor and has a texture that falls between a potato and cucumber, though it reminds me, at times, of an apple. For this recipe, I peeled it and diced it, and steamed it until tender. And though I steamed it in chicken broth (because I had some!), you can—of course—just steam in water. Chayote and grilled peach salsa is great on top of grilled fish or chicken, vegetables—or even just on its own with chips. Would love to hear your ideas! Until then, ¡Buen provecho! Enjoy!Chayote and peach salsa

Latin Twist: Chayote and Grilled Peach Salsa

Yield: About 4 cups

This recipe is adapted from Nueva Salsa Recipes to Spice It Up by Rafael Palomino and Arlen Gargagliano. The original calls for ají amarillo, but serrano chile is a good substitute. Also, this salsa can be made up to 2 days ahead, refrigerated and brought to room temperature before serving. Makes about 4 cups salsa.

Ingredients

  • This recipe is adapted from Nueva Salsa Recipes to Spice It Up by Rafael Palomino and Arlen Gargagliano. The original calls for ají amarillo, but serrano chile is a good substitute.
  • Makes about 4 cups salsa
  • 2 chayotes, peeled, seeded and diced and steamed until tender (Note: Cool to room temperature before adding!)
  • 4 peaches, halved, pitted, and grilled
  • 1 cucumber, peeled, seeded and diced
  • 2 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar
  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons ají amarillo paste or to taste (you can also use 1 to 2 seeded and finely chopped serrano chiles)
  • Fresh chopped cilantro leaves for garnish

Instructions

  1. Simmer the orange juice in a small saucepan until reduced by half.
  2. Let it cool to room temperature.
  3. Combine the orange juice with all remaining ingredients and allow to sit for about 20 minutes before serving.
http://food.lohudblogs.com/2014/07/18/latin-twist-chayote-and-grilled-peach-salsa/

 

 

This recipe is adapted from Nueva Salsa Recipes to Spice It Up by Rafael Palomino and Arlen Gargagliano. The original calls for ají amarillo, but serrano chile is a good substitute.

Makes about 4 cups salsa

2 chayotes, peeled, seeded and diced and steamed until tender (Note: Cool to room temperature before adding!)
4 peaches, halved, pitted, and grilled
1 cucumber, peeled, seeded and diced
2 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar
1/3 cup olive oil
2 teaspoons ají amarillo paste or to taste (you can also use 1 to 2 seeded and finely chopped serrano chiles)
Fresh chopped cilantro leaves for garnish

Simmer the orange juice in a small saucepan until reduced by half. Let it cool to room temperature.
Combine the orange juice with all remaining ingredients and allow to sit for about 20 minutes before serving. This salsa can be made up to 2 days ahead, refrigerated and brought to room temperature before serving.

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About Author

Maybe it was the dinner parties my mom always threw—or the hours I spent prepping and cooking alongside her (and then on my own!). Or maybe it was array of fabulous dishes that my family sampled in New York City’s richly diverse restaurants, but I’ve loved creating, savoring, and sharing food for as long as I can remember. Living in Spain, and later in Peru, also greatly influenced my life. These years abroad taught me Spanish—and about living in different countries–but also introduced me to teaching English as a second language, which I’ve done—mostly in the US– for the past 20-plus (yikes!) years. I’ve authored two cocktail/tapas books, Mambo Mixers and Calypso Coolers, coauthored more than 15 others (mostly food related!), and raised two children. Now I’m chef and owner of my own restaurant, Mambo 64 in Tuckahoe, New York. My message is the same, whether I’m teaching, writing, running the restaurant or being a regular guest on the Spanish-language network Telemundo (on the morning show, Buenos Días Nueva York!). My belief in food—and the power of food—is far reaching, and is married with another one: the power of stories. I’m sure that if we could all sit down and have meals together, sharing both tastes and tales, we’d have peace on earth. Enjoy!

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