Apple-Honey Kugel

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July 28, 2014 PHOTO; FOR USE WITH AP LIFESTYLES

Similar to a bread pudding held together by a rich, creamy custard, our apple-honey kugel is a perfect dessert for fall, as well as a fine dish for your Rosh Hashana table. The tart apples lend a gentle sweetness and bright flavor complemented by raisins, cinnamon and nutmeg.

Feel like mixing it up a bit? Additional fruits and some toasted nuts would fit right with the rest of the recipe. — Alison Ladman

Apple-Honey Kugel

Apple-Honey Kugel

Start to finish: 1 hour (15 minutes active). Servings: 16. By The Associated Press

Ingredients

  • Apple-Honey Kugel
  • 16-ounce tub mascarpone
  • 16-ounce tub sour cream
  • 1/2 cup light cream
  • 3/4 cup honey
  • 6 eggs
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 3/4 cup raisins
  • 2 apples, peeled, cored and diced small
  • 16 ounces egg noodles, boiled until just al dente
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 tablespoon cinnamon

Instructions

  1. Heat the oven to 350 F. Coat a 9-by-13-inch baking dish with cooking spray.
  2. In a food processor, combine the mascarpone, sour cream, light cream, honey, eggs, nutmeg and salt. Process until smooth.
  3. In a large bowl, mix together the raisins, apples, cooked egg noodles and the egg mixture. Spoon into the prepared pan.
  4. In a small bowl, mix together the sugar and cinnamon, then sprinkle over the top of the kugel. Bake until the custard is set and slightly puffed, 35 to 45 minutes. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Notes

Nutrition information per serving: 420 calories; 200 calories from fat (48 percent of total calories); 22 g fat (12 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 150 mg cholesterol; 46 g carbohydrate; 2 g fiber; 24 g sugar

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About Author

Liz Johnson is content strategist for The Journal News and lohud.com, and the founding editor of lohudfood, formerly know as Small Bites. As food editor, she won awards from the New York News Publishers Association, the Association of Food Journalists and the Associated Press. She lives in Nyack with her husband and daughter on a tiny suburban lot they call their farm — with fruit trees, an herb garden, and a yardful of lettuce, tomatoes, onions, shallots, cucumbers, zucchini, radishes, cabbage, peppers, Brussels sprouts and carrots and four big blueberry bushes.

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