Peggy’s Roasted Tomato Spread

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Named for food editor Liz Johnson’s friend Peggy, who served this as an hors d’oeuvre at a late-summer dinner party, roasting coaxes the flavor out of not-quite-ripe tomatoes. It’s lovely with goat cheese and baguette slices. Olives are nice, too. Fold the leftovers into scrambled eggs for breakfast.

Peggy’s Roasted Tomato Spread

Peggy’s Roasted Tomato Spread

Named for food editor Liz Johnson’s friend Peggy, who served this as an hors d’oeuvre at a late-summer dinner party, roasting coaxes the flavor out of not-quite-ripe tomatoes. It’s lovely with goat cheese and baguette slices. Olives are nice, too. Fold the leftovers into scrambled eggs for breakfast.

Ingredients

  • 6-7 tomatoes, cored and roughly chopped
  • 3 tablespoons Pecorino
  • 5-6 sprigs thyme
  • 1/4 cup basil leaves, chopped

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350.
  2. Place the cored and chopped tomatoes in a glass or ceramic baking dish and sprinkle Pecorino and thyme over them. Toss gently with a spoon.
  3. Roast for 2 to 2 1/2 hours, until the tomatoes are very soft but still slightly chunky, not quite the consistency of applesauce. Add basil and check to see if it needs salt (it may not).
http://food.lohudblogs.com/2014/09/26/peggys-roasted-tomato-spread/

Peggy’s Roasted Tomato Spread

6-7 tomatoes, cored and roughly chopped

3 tablespoons Pecorino

5-6 sprigs thyme

1/4 cup basil leaves, chopped

Preheat oven to 350.

Place the cored and chopped tomatoes in a glass or ceramic baking dish and sprinkle Pecorino and thyme over them. Toss gently with a spoon.

Roast for 2 to 2 1/2 hours, until the tomatoes are very soft but still slightly chunky, not quite the consistency of applesauce. Add basil and check to see if it needs salt (it may not).

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About Author

Liz Johnson is content strategist for The Journal News and lohud.com, and the founding editor of lohudfood, formerly know as Small Bites. As food editor, she won awards from the New York News Publishers Association, the Association of Food Journalists and the Associated Press. She lives in Nyack with her husband and daughter on a tiny suburban lot they call their farm — with fruit trees, an herb garden, and a yardful of lettuce, tomatoes, onions, shallots, cucumbers, zucchini, radishes, cabbage, peppers, Brussels sprouts and carrots and four big blueberry bushes.

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