Tomato Soup

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This recipe is from Jeffrey Bloomer of Slate, who writes: “Tomatoes should be the star ingredient, and practically the only ingredient. Since I have no passed-down family recipe, the only kind that seems to exist for tomato soup, I finally adapted one from someone else’s grandmother. This recipe gets two things unforgettably correct: The perfect tomato soup fully embraces its central ingredient, and, crucially, it should only be made when the absolute best tomatoes are available — like right now.

I will stick to calling this a tomato soup, but the correct course is to include some cream. Its richness wonderfully balances the tomatoes’ lingering acidity. The key is to take a light hand. And through many attempts of roasting, stewing and otherwise pulverizing tomatoes, I’ve come to appreciate my Internet-adopted grandmother’s method of slowly cooking them in a couple pats of butter (not olive oil), letting the pulp break down and the juices flow.

Finally, you must resist the urges of your childhood and leave the soup thick and chunky. You want the last bits of tomato to melt in your mouth, not in the pan.” Prep time: 15 minutes; Cook time: 22 minutes; Serves 3.

Tomato Soup

Tomato Soup

This recipe is from Jeffrey Bloomer of Slate, who writes: “Tomatoes should be the star ingredient, and practically the only ingredient. Since I have no passed-down family recipe, the only kind that seems to exist for tomato soup, I finally adapted one from someone else’s grandmother. This recipe gets two things unforgettably correct: The perfect tomato soup fully embraces its central ingredient, and, crucially, it should only be made when the absolute best tomatoes are available — like right now.

I will stick to calling this a tomato soup, but the correct course is to include some cream. Its richness wonderfully balances the tomatoes’ lingering acidity. The key is to take a light hand. And through many attempts of roasting, stewing and otherwise pulverizing tomatoes, I’ve come to appreciate my Internet-adopted grandmother’s method of slowly cooking them in a couple pats of butter (not olive oil), letting the pulp break down and the juices flow.

Finally, you must resist the urges of your childhood and leave the soup thick and chunky. You want the last bits of tomato to melt in your mouth, not in the pan.”

Prep time: 15 minutes; Cook time: 22 minutes; Serves 3.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 4 to 5 medium ripe tomatoes, halved
  • Flaky salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/3 cup cream
  • 1 large sprig of rosemary or thyme, optional

Instructions

  1. Put the butter in a large skillet over medium heat. When it melts, add the tomatoes, cut side down, and season with salt and pepper. Cook until the tomatoes have released most their juices (but aren’t charred), 10 to 15 minutes. Turn the tomatoes over and cook until they begin to break down, 5 to 7 minutes.
  2. Remove the pan from the heat. After 30 seconds, add the cream and stir, scraping the bottom of the pot as you go. Use the spoon to break down the tomatoes to a chunky but spoonable consistency. Add the thyme or rosemary sprig, if desired. Taste and adjust the seasoning; serve warm.
  3. (Store leftover soup in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to a few days.)
http://food.lohudblogs.com/2014/09/26/tomato-soup/

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About Author

Liz Johnson is content strategist for The Journal News and lohud.com, and the founding editor of lohudfood, formerly know as Small Bites. As food editor, she won awards from the New York News Publishers Association, the Association of Food Journalists and the Associated Press. She lives in Nyack with her husband and daughter on a tiny suburban lot they call their farm — with fruit trees, an herb garden, and a yardful of lettuce, tomatoes, onions, shallots, cucumbers, zucchini, radishes, cabbage, peppers, Brussels sprouts and carrots and four big blueberry bushes.

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