Latin Twist: Sorrel Champagne Cocktail

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These days, many of us have  Thanksgiving on the mind. Over the past several weeks, we Small Bites bloggers have been giving you some ideas and suggestions for serving and enjoying on our Turkey Day.  Well, whether you’re hosting, or going as a guest, here’s a prosecco drink, the Sorrel Champagne Cocktail,  that you might just add to your repertoire. In fact, this sip may take you right through the holidays, and beyond! First, let me introduce you to sorrel. Jamaican sorrel, or red hibiscus flowers, can be found throughout the Caribbean–and in Mexico. When boiled, the petals turn the water a deep crimson. Add a bit of cinnamon, ginger, cloves and sugar, and you’ve got a gorgeous and aromatic “syrup” that can be  added to an array of liquids, including prosecco. This cocktail boasts seasonal color and flavor! Would love to hear your sorrel story. In the meantime, ¡Buen provecho! Enjoy! Prosecco cocktails 1

This trinity of prosecco cocktails: the Bellini, the Sorrel Champagne Cocktail (recipe here!), and the Stout Prosecco Cocktail, that are sure to be hit. Not only are these three different and tasty, they’re also lovely to behold! 

Latin Twist: Sorrel Champagne Cocktail

Yield: Between 8 and 12 servings

Deep wine in color, and fabulous in ginger meets cinnamon flavor, the Sorrel Champagne Cocktail (made with prosecco!), is a great make-ahead cocktail!

Ingredients

  • 32 ounces water
  • 1 cup dried sorrel blossoms, picked over, discolored pieces discarded
  • 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 3 whole cloves
  • 1/2 cup superfine sugar, or to taste
  • 1 (750-milliliter) bottle Spanish Gava, Prosecco, or other sparkling wine
  • Turbinado sugar for rimming the glass (optional)
  • Half-moon orange slices, for garnish

Instructions

  1. Bring the water to a boil in a large pot.
  2. Add the sorrel, ginger, cinnamon sticks, and cloves, and stir.
  3. Turn off the heat, cover, and steep for 4 hours or until cooled to room temperature; refrigerate overnight.
  4. Strain, sweeten with sugar to taste, and chill well for up to one week.
  5. Just before serving, combine the sorrel mixture in equal parts with the sparkling wine.
  6. Garnish the rim with turbinado sugar (optional)
  7. Serve in champagne glasses, garnished with orange slices.
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Sorrel Champagne Cocktail (From Calypso Coolers by Arlen Gargagliano, Stewart Tabori & Chang © 2007)

Serves: 8 to 12
Ingredients:
32 ounces water
1 cup dried sorrel blossoms, picked over, discolored pieces discarded
1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
2 cinnamon sticks
3 whole cloves
1/2 cup superfine sugar, or to taste
1 (750-milliliter) bottle Spanish Gava, Prosecco, or other sparkling wine
Turbinado sugar for rimming the glass (optional)
Half-moon orange slices, for garnish

Directions:

Bring the water to a boil in a large pot. Add the sorrel, ginger, cinnamon sticks, and cloves, and stir. Turn off the heat, cover, and steep for 4 hours or until cooled to room temperature; refrigerate overnight. Strain, sweeten with sugar to taste, and chill well for up to one week. Just before serving, combine the sorrel mixture in equal parts with the sparkling wine. Serve in champagne glasses, rimmed with turbinado sugar (optional), and garnished with orange slices.

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About Author

Maybe it was the dinner parties my mom always threw—or the hours I spent prepping and cooking alongside her (and then on my own!). Or maybe it was array of fabulous dishes that my family sampled in New York City’s richly diverse restaurants, but I’ve loved creating, savoring, and sharing food for as long as I can remember. Living in Spain, and later in Peru, also greatly influenced my life. These years abroad taught me Spanish—and about living in different countries--but also introduced me to teaching English as a second language, which I’ve done—mostly in the US-- for the past 20-plus (yikes!) years. I’ve authored two cocktail/tapas books, Mambo Mixers and Calypso Coolers, coauthored more than 15 others (mostly food related!), and raised two children. Now I'm chef and owner of my own restaurant, Mambo 64 in Tuckahoe, New York. My message is the same, whether I'm teaching, writing, running the restaurant or being a regular guest on the Spanish-language network Telemundo (on the morning show, Buenos Días Nueva York!). My belief in food—and the power of food—is far reaching, and is married with another one: the power of stories. I’m sure that if we could all sit down and have meals together, sharing both tastes and tales, we’d have peace on earth. Enjoy!

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