Ecuadorian Ceviche

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Ecuadorian Ceviche 1Fresh is always the name of the game, but in this season, la primavera, it seems especially so!  And for this reason, mis amigos, I am extra inspired to serve and enjoy fresh flavors that combine to delight. A few weeks ago I shared a recipe for a Roasted Jalapeño and Mango Margarita. Today I’m sharing a treat that pairs beautifully with it: Ecuadorian Ceviche.

The first time I enjoyed a version of this Ecuadorian Ceviche was in beautiful city of Quito. Even before I took my first bite of my treat, I was enamored by the detail of a few pieces of popcorn, placed both on top and beside my ceviche. Fun. So, not only do we have the sumptuous combination of the fresh flavors of perfectly cooked shrimp (yes, friends, unlike most of its ceviche brethren, this one is actually NOT cooked solely in citrus juices), but also a delicious, ají rojo (tomato-based salsa) bath. In fact, this tomato salsa is so good on its own, you might want to make some extra to have on hand for your chips! ¡Buen provecho! Enjoy!

Latin Twist: Ecuadorian Ceviche

Yield: About 8 to 10 servings (depending on main or side dish), 4 1/2 cups salsa

Serving Size:

Ecuadorian Shrimp Ceviche is as perfect for a luncheon--with a leafy green salad--as it is for a soirée starter! This two-in-one recipe is also ideal for fiestas because you can cook the shrimp and salsa ahead of time, and spend more time with your guests!

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds peeled (tail on) cooked 21-25 (medium) shrimp (cook it in coconut milk or beer for a great infusion of flavor--but don't overcook!)
  • 2 medium red onions, sliced very thinly
  • Juice of 10 limes
  • Juice of 1 orange
  • Aji rojo
  • 1 medium red onion, finely diced
  • 6 seeded plum tomatoes, finely diced
  • 2 cups tomato juice
  • 1/2 cup white balsamic vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons chipotle purée, or to taste
  • Juice of 1/2 lime
  • Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
  • 1 cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • 2 ripe Hass avocados, peeled, pitted and cut into 1/4-inch dice

Instructions

  1. Soak the onion slices in salt water for about 10 minutes, rinse well and drain.
  2. Combine the cooked shrimp, onions, citrus juices together in a large bowl and let it sit in the fridge for at least an hour (2 hours is ideal).
  3. To serve, spoon a bit of Aji Rojo (recipe below) in a cup (a champagne glass makes a gorgeous presentation)add several shrimp, and then top with the tomato salsa so that the shrimp is surrounded by and resting on a salsa bath.
  4. Serve with popcorn or patacones (fried green plantains).
  5. Aji rojo: In a large bowl, combine red onion, plum tomatoes, and tomato juice.
  6. Gently stir, with a wooden spoon or your hand, just until blended.
  7. Add in the chiptle purée, lime juice, salt, and pepper.
  8. Let sit for about 20 minutes, then stir in the cilantro and avocado and serve.
http://food.lohudblogs.com/2015/04/13/latin-twist-ecuadorian-ceviche/

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About Author

Maybe it was the dinner parties my mom always threw—or the hours I spent prepping and cooking alongside her (and then on my own!). Or maybe it was array of fabulous dishes that my family sampled in New York City’s richly diverse restaurants, but I’ve loved creating, savoring, and sharing food for as long as I can remember. Living in Spain, and later in Peru, also greatly influenced my life. These years abroad taught me Spanish—and about living in different countries--but also introduced me to teaching English as a second language, which I’ve done—mostly in the US-- for the past 20-plus (yikes!) years. I’ve authored two cocktail/tapas books, Mambo Mixers and Calypso Coolers, coauthored more than 15 others (mostly food related!), and raised two children. Now I'm chef and owner of my own restaurant, Mambo 64 in Tuckahoe, New York. My message is the same, whether I'm teaching, writing, running the restaurant or being a regular guest on the Spanish-language network Telemundo (on the morning show, Buenos Días Nueva York!). My belief in food—and the power of food—is far reaching, and is married with another one: the power of stories. I’m sure that if we could all sit down and have meals together, sharing both tastes and tales, we’d have peace on earth. Enjoy!

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